Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Tuesday Tools

Good morning
Grace and peace be unto you

First celebrated in 1926, the week was expanded into Black History Month in 1976 as part of the nation's bicentennial. Each year, the U.S. President proclaims February as National African American History Month. Heart disease, cancer, and stroke are the leading causes of death for African Americans.

In the famous words of Joe Madison, "So what are you going to do about it?" If you know that you have family history then start young with your kids. Make them aware of why exercise and eating right is important. This us not something for the school system.
Given our present governmental climate we might not have health care or extension services to help bridge gaps in our income. So it is important that we begin to get on top of our well-being.

And as always remember to. . . live Blessed

Sunday, February 26, 2017

Monday Motivation

Good Morning,
Grace and Peace be to you.

Before a dream can come true it must first be conceived. What do you see that needs to be changed? Who do you see that needs help in reaching their potential?

In our communities many dreams are dash before the whole thought can be processed. Make sure you are a cultivator, not a undertaker. Dream killers are a dime a dozen. You are worth more then that. 

And as always remember to. . . live Blessed 


Thursday, February 23, 2017

Thursday Thoughts

Good morning
Grace and peace be unto you

Perspective is what is on my mind this morning. We all have different ones and none of us are wrong. Lol You won't ever totally relate or get my perspective because you can never stand in my shoes and see through my eyes.

And as always remember to. . . live Blessed

Monday, February 20, 2017

Tuesday Tools

Good morning,
Grace and peace be unto you.

As we continue black history month we are going to look at one of the major issues that continue to plague the African American community.

Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity

Obesity is a problem in the African American community and is related to conditions like heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Obesity is common, serious, and costly. The estimated annual medical cost of obesity in the U.S. was $147 billion in 2008.
  • African Americans are nearly 1.5 times as likely to have obesity as compared to non-Hispanic Whites.
  • From 2011-2014, the prevalence of obesity among African Americans was 48% compared to 35% of non-Hispanic Whites.
  • African Americans eat fewer vegetables than other racial/ethnic groups but eat similar amounts of fruit as non-Hispanic Whites.
  • More than half (56%) of African American adults 18 years of age and older do not meet the aerobic component of the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines.
And as always remember to...live Blessed

Monday Motivation

Good morning
Grace and peace be unto you

I wanted to share a quote with you this morning.

“IF YOU'RE GOING TO HOLD SOMEONE DOWN YOU'RE GOING TO HAVE TO HOLD ON BY THE OTHER END OF THE CHAIN. YOU ARE CONFINED BY YOUR OWN REPRESSION.” TONI MORRISON

Too often we don't think about the part that we play when repressing others. It takes our time and energy to hold them down.  It is only when we get our eye off of others and get our hands busy with our own mission that they and ourselves can truly walk in freedom. Choose freedom today.

And as always remember to. . . live Blessed

Friday, February 17, 2017

Friday Findings

Good morning
Grace and peace be unto you.

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks — the 2010 nonfiction bestseller described by The New York Times writer Dwight Garner as “one of the most graceful and moving nonfiction books I’ve read in a very long time” — is being adapted for film by HBO. According to Entertainment Weekly, the premiere date is set for April 22. The movie will star Oprah Winfrey as Lacks’s daughter, Deborah, and Rose Byrne as the book’s science journalist author, Rebecca Skloot.

Skloot’s debut tells the story of Henrietta Lacks, a poor, black woman with cervical cancer whose cells were taken without her permission. Later called HeLa cells, they were used as the basis for valuable medical research, including the development of the polio vaccine, cloning, and more.

Hum, it's interesting how all these films are coming out showing the contributions that blacks have had,  yet we are told that we didn't contribute to society.  I beg to differ.

And as always remember to. . . live Blessed

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Thursday Thoughts

Good morning
Grace and peace be unto you.

Today we celebrate another local African American.
Dr. Watson-Thompson, Character Counts Awardee, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Applied Behavioral Science, and Associate Director for the Work Group for Community Health and Development at the University of Kansas. Through her collaborative research, teaching and service she partners with communities to address community health and development issues through the application of community-based behavioral psychology. Her research focuses on neighborhood development, positive youth development, adolescent substance abuse and violence prevention through a community-engaged scholarship approach.

Jomella grew up in Arkansas City, Ks where  she graduated from High School, with honors. She attended and graduated, in 2001, from Jackson State University in Jackson, Mississippi. From there she was accepted into the doctoral program at the University of Kansas. She became Dr. Thompson in 2007 with a Ph.d in Behavioral Science.

For more information check her out on LinkedIn.
https://www.linkedin.com/in/jomella-watson-thompson-9ba7571

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Wednesday Word

Good morning
Grace and peace be unto you.
In our society of hypersexuality we have lost the real meaning of love.
Yes,  it can be sexual but that is only one small piece of love.

1 Corinthians 13 tells a little more about love.
4 Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. 5 It does not dishonor others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. 6 Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. 7 It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.

So if the "love" that you are getting is disrespectful, unkind, boastful, rejoices when you are hurting, and doesn't protect your physical, mental, and financial well-being, that is NOT love.

The world is crazy all on its own, we need to make sure that our protected environments feed our beings so they we can walk out with  super woman on our chest.

And as always remember to. . . live Blessed

Monday, February 13, 2017

Monday Motivation

Good morning
Grace and peace be unto you.

One thing that I really want us to do, is get our money together. To be a blessing to others you have to have your own affairs in order.

2017 needs to be the year of ownership. We need to be the lenders not the barrowers.

I want to share some information I found about some women who are doing big things when it comes to personal finance.  You will definitely want to check out their material. Knowledge is power. You fix what you do t know.

And as always remember to. . . live Blessed

Friday, February 10, 2017

Friday Findings

Good morning
Grace and peace be unto you.

If inclusion in the work space is important to you, check out this article.

https://blog.techinclusion.co/dont-go-it-alone-the-importance-of-partnerships-in-diversity-inclusion-22fccf6091c1#.yuhi8gdr1

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Thursday Thoughts

Good morning,
Grace and Peace be unto you.

Too often we shine the light on Hollywood  "celebrities" when we have some right among us.

I want share with you...
Judge Jennifer Lynn Jones holds the distinction of being the first African American woman to serve as a judge in the State of Kansas. Born in Wichita Kansas on September 25, 1960 to Nannie Hatch and Leamon Jones, both Oklahoma natives, Jennifer was the fifth of seven children. She attended Wichita's Southeast High School where she graduated in 1978.

After high school, Jones enrolled at Emporia State University and then transferred to the University of Missouri at Columbia where, in 1982, she received her bachelor's degree in Social Work. Determined to continue her education, Jones was accepted to the University of Oklahoma Law School. While there, she was a member of many clubs and societies and served as President of the Black Law Students Association. Jones received her J.D. degree in May, 1985. Following law school, Jones began her career in the office of the District Attorney of Muskogee, Oklahoma. While working for the District Attorney, she developed a specialty in prosecuting sex offenses, child abuse and juvenile cases. In May 1988, she returned to Wichita for a position with the law firm of Bruce and Davis. She became a partner at the firm in 1992. That same year, Jones ran for and was elected Sedgwick County District Court Judge, making her the first African American woman to hold the position of judge in the State of Kansas.

In January of 2001, Judge Jones was appointed to the Municipal Court for the City of Wichita, Kansas. Although the duties of this position demand a lot of her time and energy, she strives to remain active in her community, church and the lives of her two children. Judge Jones also has the honor of being selected by the Kansas Supreme Court to serve as a member of the Commission on Judicial Qualifications. The commission reviews ethical violations of judges throughout the State of Kansas.

Jennifer Jones was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 29, 2002.

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Wednesday Word

Good Morning, 
Grace and Peace be unto you.

Today's word comes from Proverbs 1: 2-5. If we have ever needed to know how to discern and to move skillfully with wisdom, it is now. God help us to put this into practice. 

To know [skillful and godly] wisdom and instruction; To discern and comprehend the words of understanding and insight

To receive instruction in wise behavior and the discipline of wise thoughtfulness,  Righteousness, justice, and integrity;

That prudence (good judgment, astute common sense) may be given to the naive  or  inexperienced [who are easily misled], And knowledge and discretion (intelligent discernment) to the youth,

The wise will hear and increase their learning, And the person of understanding will acquire wise counsel and the skill [to steer his course wisely and lead others to the truth]

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Tuesday Tools

Good morning,
Grace and Peace be unto you.

Today in Tuesday Tools I want to share with you something that you might not have known.

Lonnie George Johnson
October 6, 1949 (age 67)
Mobile, Alabama
Williamson High School
Tuskegee University
Engineer, inventor
Known forSuper Soaker

Johnson is an American inventor and engineer who holds more than 80 patents.

Johnson is best known for inventing the Super Soaker water gun, which has ranked among the world's top 20 best-selling toys every year since its release.

While doing work with the U.S. Air Force, he still had time for his hobbies. This is when he first thought of the Super Soaker (officially there is not a space between Super and Soaker). On October 14, 1983 he applied for a U.S. patent. On May 27, 1986 he received patent number 4,591,071. Initially it was called the “Power Drencher” when it appeared in toy shops in 1990, but after some tweaks and remarketing, it got its official name. Selling between $10 to $60 depending on the model, the Super Soaker took off, generating $200 million in sales in 1991. Shortly after making the deal for the Super Soaker with the Larami Corporation, Larami became a subsidiary of Hasbro Inc. in February 1995. But being an inventor, Johnson came up with another idea: replacing the water in the SuperSoaker with a "toy [Nerf] projectile." In 1996, Johnson received patent US5553598 A for "Pneumatic launcher for a toy projectile and the like." These Nerf toy guns have generated millions for Hasbro and Johnson.

Unfortunately, Johnson discovered he was underpaid royalties for the Super Soaker and several "Nerf line of toys, specifically the N-Strike and Dart Tag brands." In November 2013, Johnson was awarded nearly $73 million in royalties from Hasbro Inc. in arbitration. According to Hasbro, the Super Soaker is approaching sales of $1 billion.

Monday, February 6, 2017

Monday Motivation

Good morning,
Grace and Peace be unto you.

I wanted to share  a little Monday Motivation. Today, it comes from Wilma Rudolph

"Never underestimate the power of dreams and the influence of the human spirit. We are all the same in this notion: The potential for greatness lives within each of us."

The potential is in us all, but what are we going to do with it? Potential  is like energy it is being stored up but is only used when activated. You have to plug up the heater and turn it on to be warmed.

Many of us have things boil on the inside what to be brought forth but we haven't plugged in and turned it on. You glogirl.

And as always remember to... live Blessed

Friday, February 3, 2017

Friday Findings

Good morning
Grace and peace be unto you.
Since to is wear red day I wanted to in corporate that with black history.

In 1893,  Chicago surgeon Daniel Hale Williams performed the first successful open-heart surgery, in what would become both a significant medical advancement, and a huge step in the fight for equality, since Williams was one of the nation’s few black cardiologists at the time.

Called “the father of black surgery,” Williams’ name is absent from many medical history books, according to TMW Media, which makes educational videos for use in schools.

Williams studied medicine at Northwestern University’s Chicago-based medical school after apprenticing with Dr. Henry Palmer, becoming one of the first black physicians in the city when he earned his M.D. in 1883, BET Health News reports. In addition to his notable accomplishments as a surgeon, Williams is remembered for founding the Provident Hospital and Training School in 1891, inspired by the experience of a black woman who was denied from nursing schools because of her race.

On July 9, 1893, a man entered Provident Hospital with a stab wound dangerously close to his heart, according to NewsOne. Williams operated, repairing the heart’s lining surgically, and the patient recovered fully within two months. “Dr. Hale Williams, back in 1893, had performed the first cardiac operation in the United States, and possibly the world as far as records show,” Dr. Jonathan O. Nwiloh, a cardiothoracic surgeon, told TMW Media.

Reopened in 1993 after a six-year closure brought on by financial difficulties, Provident Hospital of Cook County still operates, and holds the distinction of being the nation’s first black-owned and operated hospital in the country, according to the Provident Foundation, which focuses on preserving the institution’s historical legacy.

Thursday, February 2, 2017

Thursday Thoughts

Good morning,
Grace and Peace be unto you.
Did you know?

Alfred L. Cralle (September 4, 1866 – May 3, 1920) was an African-American businessman.

Cralle was born in Kenbridge, Lunenburg County, Virginia in 1866 just after the end of the American Civil War (1861–1865). He attended local schools and worked with his father in the carpentry trade as a young man, becoming interested in mechanics. He was sent to Washington, DC where he attended Wayland Seminary, one of a number of schools founded by the American Baptist Home Mission Society to help educate African-Americans after the Civil War.

After his education, Cralle settled in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania where he first served as a porter in a drug store and at a hotel. In 1897, at the age of 30, he received a patent for the "Ice Cream Mold and Disher," a type of ice cream disher (a scoop with a built-in scraper). He later become an assistant manager in a local business association.

Cralle died in a car accident in 1920, survived by his daughter.

Lest we forget. This country was created off of the backs of African Americans.

And as always remember to... live Blessed

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Wednesday Word

Good morning
Grace and Peace be unto you.
This morning a song came to me instead of a scripture. I want to share it.

Time is filled with swift transition,
Naught of earth unmoved can stand,
Build your hopes on things eternal,
Hold to God’s unchanging hand.

Refrain:
Hold to God’s unchanging hand,
Hold to God’s unchanging hand;
Build your hopes on things eternal,
Hold to God’s unchanging hand.

Trust in Him who will not leave you,
Whatsoever years may bring,
If by earthly friends forsaken
Still more closely to Him cling.

Covet not this world’s vain riches
That so rapidly decay,
Seek to gain the heav’nly treasures,
They will never pass away.

When your journey is completed,
If to God you have been true,
Fair and bright the home in glory
Your enraptured soul will view.

Too often we don't go back to some of these hymns that truly can help us get through tough times. Hold to his hand.

And as always remember to...live Blessed

Informational Tuesday

Good morning Friend, Grace and peace be unto you! Change only comes when you open your mind to the possibilities that the inconvenient th...